Adrian’s Birthday Celebrations

Adrian’s 7th birthday celebrations lasted for three days. We started on his actual birthday with the bubble machine. Best birthday gift ever!

Adrian's Birthday Celebrations

For breakfast, he had Klondike Bars. Nothing like ice cream for breakfast on your birthday. Friday afternoon, we took the little guys to Chuck E. Cheese’s where they played for a couple hours.

Since Ani was at Youth Conference until Saturday afternoon, we celebrated Adrian’s birthday as a family on Saturday. We went to a trampoline park.

Adrian's Birthday Celebrations

Adrian's Birthday Celebrations

Then we went to see Inside Out (good, but not great, and not a must see again sort of movie). We ate dinner at Red Robin on the way home. Adrian loved being sung to and given an ice cream sundae. We finished the evening by watching the newest Girl Meets World, Girl Meets Hurricane (excellent, and a definite must watch again sort of episode).

Adrian’s only complaint was that he didn’t have a cake. Since two of us are strictly gluten free, we didn’t even think about getting a cake. Ani volunteered to bake a gluten free cake on Sunday. It turned out very good (she even made the buttercream frosting from scratch – 3 whole sticks of butter are in the 4 cups of icing!).

Adrian's Birthday Celebrations

Adrian's Birthday Celebrations

Turning 7 was very exciting for Adrian and he loved his whole weekend of fun. He has told us for months that 7-year-olds do things 6-year-olds don’t do like always getting themselves dressed and buckling their own carseat. True to his word, starting on Friday, Adrian has been doing all the things he promised 7-year-olds do. Apparently in his mind 7 is when you become a “big kid.”

More Gluten Free Baking

Ani loves to bake so being diagnosed with Celiac Disease was doubly hard for her. But then my friend gave us America’s Test Kitchen Gluten Free Baking. Everything we’ve made has been so good and Ani is so happy to be able to bake again.

More Gluten Free Baking
I usually make a double batch of their flour blend (it contains white rice flour, brown rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, and dry milk powder). That equals about 5 pounds of flour and fits perfectly in my large kitchen storage container.

More Gluten Free Baking
Chocolate chip cookies – Ani made these with half mini semi-sweet chips and half regular size milk chocolate chips.

More Gluten Free Baking
Shortbread – Ani forgot to turn the temperature down for baking so it was a bit crumbly, but it still melted in our mouths and tasted great.

More Gluten Free Baking
Peanut butter cookies – Ani’s made these twice and they are incredible both times. Peanut butter cookies are my favorite!

More Gluten Free Baking
Pizza – I’ve made the pizza three times now. The crust is a perfect mix of crunchy and chewy.

More Gluten Free Baking
Chocolate chip muffins – I used the blueberry muffin recipe to make these. I think they’d be much better with milk chocolate chips instead of semi-sweet chips. I want to try them using strawberries cut up in little pieces and also try apple bits with extra cinnamon.

More Gluten Free Baking
Bread – The bread is what makes me the happiest. I don’t like most pre-made gluten free breads. They have a slimy feel to me and they are also super expensive. This bread, while slightly pink (due to the psyllium husk) which takes a bit to get used to, tastes like bread made from regular flour. It works to just eat, as peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, and makes nice grilled cheese, too.

Playing With Numbers

Adrian really likes math. Since we started with Math-U-See, he has enjoyed playing with numbers more than ever, most likely because the blocks made it more fun. Sometimes he’s have a problem to solve like 12-7=? and he’d pull out a 7 and a 5 block and put them together to make 12 and then take away the 7 to leave the 5. Clearly, he knew the answer immediately*, but wanted to go through the process of using blocks.

A couple nights ago he started asking me questions about fractions. He asked what a quarter of 100 was. I told him 25. Then he asked what a quarter of 60 was. I told him 15. His next question was what a quarter of 6 was. I told him 1 1/2. He thought about that and then said two quarters would make 3, so half of six is 3. His next question was what was a quarter of 5. I told him 1 1/4. That one required even more thought, but he did figure out that a half of 5, then, would be 2 1/2. It went on for a while with other numbers, too. The most interesting part of it is Adrian has never been formally taught about fractions.

Negative numbers really were a scary, horrible thing for his oldest two siblings when they were first taught about them. Adrian, however, already thinks negative numbers are the coolest thing ever. When asked something like what is 2-8, he usually does the typical automatically subtracting two from eight to get six, but if we remind him that the question is asking him to subtract the bigger number from the smaller number, he gets the correct answer of -6.

He does all this in his head. For fun. He finally admits he knows how to read, but he still doesn’t like it. He claims he doesn’t know how to write at all, but 7 year olds do and he’ll be 7 in a little less than a week and will start writing then. But math. Math is different. He loves playing with numbers.

*If he hadn’t known the answer immediately, he was instructed to put together a 10 block and 2 block to make the 12, put an upside-down 7 block on top to indicate subtracting 7, and then count what was left uncovered or use blocks to match the number of leftover blocks.