Ani’s Room, Part 2

Several months ago I posted about starting to redo Ani’s room. It’s been slow going, but we’re almost done (much to Cameron’s delight since his room is next – thankfully his plan is way simpler than Ani’s!).

Once we had her room all painted white, I used Frog Tape to form randomly sized triangles all around her room.
Ani's Room, Part 2

Then we used the five colors Ani picked out (yellow, blue, purple, orange, and green) to randomly paint inside the triangles. (The exception to the triangles is behind the shelves where it is pink and behind the desk where it is deep pinkish red.)
Ani's Room, Part 2

When we pulled off the tape, the edges were rather fuzzy. The texture on our walls makes it so good lines take a lot of work. I spent about 40 or so hours listening to Literary Disco podcasts and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and making those lines nice and straight. (Side note: I usually can’t pay attention to audiobooks, but while doing something mindless apparently I can.)
Ani's Room, Part 2

Jamie, Cameron, and Fritz installed the floor. Once we got a good saw it went in so fast. It’s gorgeous.
Ani's Room, Part 2

We put in new baseboard trim. The old stuff looked white until we painting the room white. Then it looked like an ugly shade of yellowish beige.
Ani's Room, Part 2

I painted the shelves white (they were as ugly as the old baseboards).
Ani's Room, Part 2

We installed an outlet with USB ports. We painted the outlet and light switch covers random colors from the triangles and screwed them in place. The outlet covers on the shelves/desk wall are painted the pink/pinkish red opposite what the walls they are on.
Ani's Room, Part 2

We got a bedset that goes nicely with the room and white cordless blinds for the windows. Ani loves being back in her room again even though it’s not quite done yet (she was sleeping in the room my parents will be in once they move here).
Ani's Room, Part 2

We still need to finish painting her door white and put that up, get curtains for her windows, and do a few touch-ups on the triangles. Her closet is a different story. We removed the door and wire shelving and painted the walls and ceiling using the leftover paint from the shelves/desk wall. In there, she is planning to build chests to hold her clothes that double as reading benches. She’s planning to get a little chandelier and beads to go in the doorway making it a nice, cozy little nook. We’re going to move on to Cameron’s room before we finish her closet, though.

Art in November

Art in November
Object Empathy: The boys each found an object that they felt sorry for and then changed it somehow to make it better. Cameron noticed a little crack in our windshield and place a band-aid over it. Fritz found a broken piece of slate and taped it back together. Adrian found a pencil he got at a birthday party and sharpened it so it could be used.

Art in November
Make It Break It: The boys each created something and then had a brother break it. The ruined object or the act of ruining it became part of their work of art. Cameron and Adrian built cardboard creations. Fritz stabbed Cameron’s and Cameron burned Adrian’s. Fritz built a Magna-Tile building and Adrian smashed it. The pictures above are pre-destruction.

Breaking Cameron’s creation:

Breaking Fritz’s creation:

Breaking Adrian’s creation:

It took a bit to get it to catch fire. It was pretty windy out.

Once it caught fire it was quite a roaring one.
Art in November

Art in November
Fake Flyer: For this one the boys had to create a flyer for something that doesn’t exist. They decided to make one for when Donald Trump makes good on his (also fake) campaign promise to blow up the moon so he can sell the cheese for $199 per ounce. They all pitched in to make up the content and design of the flyer.

Homeless Packs

The first Sunday of this month I taught all the young women (ages 12-18) at church. This month’s Come Follow Me lessons are on Spiritual and Temporal Self-Reliance. I chose to give the lesson on What is the Lord’s way for providing for the poor and needy.

Homeless Packs

We talked about refugees, sharing the statistics I’ve collected in my research (and fact checking) and showing a couple church videos. (Invite a Refugee to Dinner and Refuge from the Storm) We talked about ways we can help the refugees and immigrants in our city. We talked about how everyone can be poor and needy in some way and how even just a smile can make a difference. We talked about the homeless population in our city. And we made homeless packs to keep in their parents’ cars and give out when they see someone homeless when they are out and about. Ani and I each made a pack and within days had given both of them out.

Homeless Packs

Each pack is in a gallon ziploc. They contain a bottle of water, a pair of socks, small pack of tissues, travel toothbrush and toothpaste, hand sanitizer, three individually wrapped wet wipes, sample size shampoo, conditioner, and lotion, bar of soap, package of nuts and two fruit by the foot in a sandwich size ziploc, and a dozen Wint-o-Green Lifesavers in a snack size ziploc. I hope those 24 homeless packs have been useful to the few Starfish* we could help with them and that has helped the young women understand a little better what they can do to provide for the poor and needy.

Homeless Packs

*Starfish comes from the story about the child throwing the starfish back into the ocean and making a difference to the one. When helping everyone seems overwhelming, the starfish story reminds us that helping even just one is better than none.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

A month or so ago my friend asked me if I’d like to join in a Jesse Tree ornament exchange. I thought that sounded like fun. I chose Samuel and made ornaments with an oil lamp on them.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I got plain white 1/4″ foam sheets for the background. I traced around a jar with a mouth about 2 1/2″ in diameter to make the circles.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I made 36 circles. I needed to send in 29 for the exchange. I shipped 30 in case one got messed up. I pulled out the 6 worst after all 36 were put together.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I used an X-Acto knife to cut the circles out of the foam.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

Most of them turned out quite nice.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I freehand drew an oil lamp shape on paper. I cut that out and used it to trace onto glittery black self-adhesive foam. Then I cut out the oil lamp shapes. It took forever, but at least I had The Crown on Netflix to entertain me.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I peeled off the paper back and stuck the lamp shapes to the circles. It’s pretty amazing how strong the adhesive on the foam is.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I made a pattern for the main part of the flame, but just randomly did the smaller part of the flame. I cut the main part out of glittery yellow self-adhesive foam and the smaller part out of glittery red self-adhesive foam. I attached the red part to the yellow to make the flames. I was a little concerned the glitter would make it so they wouldn’t stick very well, but I needn’t have worried. That adhesive is crazy strong.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I attached the flames to the circles so they look like they are coming out of the oil lamp.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I poked holes at the tops of the circles and pushed glittery white cord through them, tied knots to make the cord into hangers for the ornaments, shifted the cord around so the knots went inside the holes, and, after 4 1/2 hours, I had an awesome set of oil lamp ornaments to send in for the Jesse Tree exchange.

Oil Lamp Ornaments

I can’t wait to get my complete set of 29 different ornaments back. I’m looking forward to seeing what other people used to make theirs. I am sure they will all be just adorable!

October Science Experiments

We leaned about DNA and made a double helix partially unzipped with a section being replicated with RNA. We used marshmallows (the different colors represent different amino acids), beads, toothpicks, and pipe cleaners to make it.

We extracted some DNA from Cameron’s cheek cells and then looked at it under the microscope. It was quite complicated and only worked so-so.

We learned about mitosis and made posters showing the life cycle of a cell. Those posters are now on the walls of our dining room (aka schoolroom).

We viewed a prepared slide of an allium (onion) root tip. We could see the cells undergoing mitosis.

We learned about the phases of meiosis. We made a flipbook showing each part.

We viewed a prepared slide of a lily anther undergoing meiosis.

We compared the genetics of the boys and their parents and three of their grandparents.

We looked at hair under the microscope.

We created our very own Qwuitekutesnute. We laid out attributes from the mother and father along with whether those traits were dominant or recessive. Then we flipped a coin to randomly assign those attributes. Using basic DD, rr, Dr, we applied those traits to our baby, resulting in our own unique Qwitekutesnute.